More Sleep May Equal Less Cravings

sleep-blog

Getting more sleep may help fight your cravings for sweet and salty foods. A study in the journal Appetite showed that when study participants got an additional 1 ½ hours of sleep a night, they reported an overall 14% drop in appetite and a 62% decrease in desire for sweet and salty fare. The researchers surmised that reduced sleep may actually alter signals in the brain, making people seek out particular foods. By making changes to your daily routine to increase the number of hours you sleep, not only may you feel more rested, but you may find your food choices also improve.

To fit more sleep into your nights, try the following suggestions:

  • Set up or pack lunches the night before
  • Pick out clothes the night before, or plan your week’s wardrobe on Sunday
  • Record your favorite late night shows to watch the following evening
  • Pick a reasonable bedtime and stick to it
  • Avoid caffeine in the afternoon so you are able to drift to sleep easily

The above suggestions are offered by staff at Dr. Shillingford’s Boca Raton, Florida office which serves patients from Miami, Miami Beach, West Palm Beach, Tampa, and Orlando as well as several other states including New York and Georgia. Dr. Shillingford’s gastric band, gastric sleeve, and gastric bypass patients often seek advice on curbing cravings. Reducing cravings may help you reduce your overall caloric intake and help achieve desired weight loss.

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